THE MUSIC COMPUTING LABTHE MUSIC COMPUTING LAB
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PEOPLE


Faculty

Simon Holland

Simon Holland v4.jpgSimon Holland founded and directs the Music Computing Lab, a research group in the Centre for Research in Computing. He is a Senior Lecturer in the Computing Department at the Open University. He has a background in Artificial Intelligence, Music, Psychology, Mathematics, Learning Technology, and Foundations of Programming. His current main research interests are Pervasive Interaction and Music Computing. He is Co-Investigator on the E-Sense Project. He has devised numerous human-centred computing techniques and systems including Harmony Space, the Haptic Drum Kit, the Audio GPS, and Direct Combination.

Robin Laney

Robin_Laney_loose_crop.jpgRobin is a Senior Lecturer in Computing and a member of the Centre for Research in Computing, where he is a coordinator for the Music Computing theme. He is interested in music computing applications that combine statistical techniques such as Markov Chains with novel user interfaces. He is currently investigating how these approaches can be used in such a way that users can drive the probabilistic choices involved. He is also involved in the development of shared touchable interfaces, as a way of exploring the social aspects of collaborative creativity.

Janet van der Linden

janet.jpgJanet is a Senior Lecturer in the Computing Department at the Open University and a member of the Centre for Research in Computing. With a background in the social sciences, artificial intelligence and Java programming, she is interested in interdisciplinary research. The focus of her research is on music and pervasive computing, with an emphasis on musicians’ posture. In the MusicJacket project she is working on technologies that support the teaching and learning of musical instruments, with the aim of making the player more aware of healthy habits at an early age.

Paul Mulholland

paulm.jpgPaul is a Research Fellow in The Knowledge Media Institute and a member of the Centre for Research in Computing. He has co-supervised PhD research in new user interfaces for timbre and in embodied cognition and music. His research interests include collaborative learning, knowledge modelling and management, end-user programming environments, software visualization and cognitive modelling. Much of Paul's research is concerned with how web and knowledge technologies can be used to support learning in different contexts, whether that be informal museum settings (CIPHER, Bletchley Park Text), informal game-playing for children (TINY-IN), the workplace (CLOCKWORK), at school (PI, SILVER, G-LEARN) or higher education (REFLEX, EuroGene).

Rob Griffiths

robg.jpgRob is a Senior Lecturer in Computing. He is involved in the OUWorkspace, which is becoming known to the worldwide Java education community and is having a profound impact on the efficacy of teaching Java to neophyte programmers. He is a founder member of the Randolph Group – a research group drawn from both business and the university sector – whose mission statement is to set the agenda for the teaching of Computing for the next 10 years. Rob is currently working on projects involving the use of Smalltalk for developing musical applications for the iPhone.

David Sharp

david sharp small.pngDavid Sharp is a Senior Lecturer in the MCT Faculty at the Open University. His primary research activities are in the Acoustics Research Group, but he also co-supervises PhD research in the Music Computing Lab. David's research interests are in musical acoustics, in particular measuring and evaluating the playing characteristics of wind instruments. David regularly delivers interactive talks on sound to both local schoolchildren and the general public. He is also an academic consultant for the BBC Coast series and has appeared on the programme several times, carrying out acoustic measurements and demonstrations.


PhD Students

Vassilis Angelis

Vassilis is a third year PhD student in the Faculty of Mathematics, Computing and Technology. His research focuses on validation and analysis of a computational model of gradient frequency neural network, which is also used to model human perception of musical rhythm.

Kurijn Buys

kurijn.jpegKurijn is a PhD student active on the edge of Music Computing and Musical Acoustics. He is examining hybrid electro-acoustic wind instrument set-ups by replacing the mouthpiece by an electronic virtual equivalent (using programmed physical exciter models on a "real-time" digital interface that is in bi-directional interaction with the real acoustic resonator). As such, the new and precise control possibilities are expected to answer questions found in the music and performance domain, as well as in the field of wind instrument research.

Matt Bellingham

Matt’s PhD research is investigating user interface design for the democratisation of end-user algorithmic software.
Matt is a Lecturer in Music Technology a the University of Wolverhampton and has worked as an engineer and producer since 1996, engineering and producing recordings for both major and independent labels. As a guitarist he has signed recording and publishing contracts and has toured the UK and northern Europe.

Andrea Francescini

Andrea is a first-year PhD student carrying out research in the Music Computing Lab. He is a member of the Centre for Research in Computing.

Andrew Gustar

Andrew gustar.jpgAndrew Gustar is a part-time interdisciplinary PhD student in the Department of Music, studying with Professor David Rowland (Music) and Kevin McConway (Statistics). He is carrying out research in Statistical Musicology entitled 'The demographics of musical works: a statistical approach to historical musicology'. This work is an evaluation of the application of statistical techniques to datasets relating to the population of musical works. The research has included a number of case studies examining published music, recorded music, key and time signatures, and other factors. This topic is an offshoot from some methodological challenges encountered during his MA dissertation on the scarcity of Western music with seven beats in the bar. His first degree was in Mathematics, and he is a Fellow of the Institute of Actuaries.

Adam Linson

Adam is a second-year PhD student in the Faculty of Mathematics, Computing and Technology.

Andrew Milne

Andy.jpegAndrew is a third-year PhD student in the Faculty of Mathematics, Computing and Technology. He is a musician and has a Batchelor's in Fine Art (Psalter Lane Art College, Sheffield Hallam University) and a Master's in Music, Mind & Technology (University of Jyväskylä, Finland). His principal research area is music cognition, with a focus on the computational modelling of the feelings of expectation and resolution induced by progressions of tones, chords, and keys (Computational Modelling of Tonality Perception). He is also researching, composing, and playing, microtonality and spatial representations of well-formed scales (Use of Multi-touch Surfaces for Microtonal Tunings).

Tom Mudd

tom.jpgTom is a doctoral student in the Music Computing Lab looking at ways in which dynamical systems can be employed in HCI, and more specifically, how they might alter engagement with digital musical instruments.

Mark Rodgers

Anthony Prechtl

Anthony is investigating an Adaptive Music Generator for Multimedia Narratives. His research interests include music cognition, microtonal music, and physical modeling of musical instruments.

Tony Steffert

Tony is a first year PhD student in the Music Computing Lab investigating the sonification of EEG and physiological data to better support therapeutic and diagnostic interventions. Tony has a first class degree and numerous publications. He has worked as a Research Assistant at Imperial College London, a Research Fellow at Goldsmiths, and as a freelance researcher/technician consultant with other universities including Graz Tech University, Hertfordshire and Barcelona Pompeu Fabra.

Katie Wilkie

Katie_small.jpgKatie is a PhD student at The Open University in the Centre for Research in Computing, researching the use of conceptual metaphors as a means to evaluate and inform the design of innovative and intuitive music interactions. Her research interests include cognitive understanding of musical concepts, embodied cognition and HCI.

Anna Xambó

Anna is a second-year PhD student in the Faculty of Mathematics, Computing and Technology. She is interested in research on design and evaluation of new tabletop and shareable interfaces for musical expression (mobile, TUI, multi-touch, social). Currently I am involved in a project of multi-touch tabletop for collaborative music making.


Interns and Visiting Researchers

Dr Anders Bouwer

anders.jpg Anders Bouwer received a PhD from the University of Amsterdam in 2006. In the course of this project he developed the VisiGarp software for inspecting qualitative simulation models in the GARP framework, as well as its successor, WiziGarp. His research interests focus on the use of Artificial Intelligence in education.

Maxime Canelli

Maxime Canelli is a 4th Year engineering student at Ecole Centrale de Nantes, France, and has joined the Music Computing Lab for the summer to work on the Haptic Bracelets and Rhythm Bracelets Projects.

Dr Mat Dalgleish

matd.jpgMat Dalgleish is a Visiting Lecturer in the School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure at the University of Wolverhampton, and a PhD candidate within the School of Art and Design at the same university. He received his Masters Degree with Distinction from Coventry University in 2006. His research interests focus on musical interaction with computers, with secondary interests that include hardware hacking and circuit bending, generative music, and procedural video game audio.

Rosa Fox

Rosa Fox is an undergraduate at the University of Sussex. Rosa succeeded in getting the Music Lab's Axon neural midi tracker to work with an electric bass guitar, and worked out how to create new guitar simulations using the software for our Line 6 guitar. Rosa also carried out essential work on the precursor to this website.

Topi Hurtig

topi.jpg Topi Hurtig is based at the University of Tampere and the University of Helsinki, where his studying for a PhD. He is experienced in design and implementation of novel multimodal (speech, tactile, haptic) mobile services, applications and interfaces. His previous projects include a mobile multimodal dialogue system for public transportation navigation.

Fabien Leon

Fabien Leon is based at the UFR Sciences et Techniques in Brest, in the Département Informatique, where he is taking a degree in Ingenierie Informatique. in 2009 he visited ICCMR in Plymouth, and the Music Computing Lab at the Open University, where he completed his project on a brain computer music interface working under the Supervision of Prof Eduardo Miranda at Plymouth and Simon Holland at the Music Computing Lab.

Gerard Roma

Gerard Roma is a PhD student in Sound and Music Computing, studying at the Music Technology Group of the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, part of its Department of Information and Communication Technologies. Gerard was a visiting student in the Music Computing Lab at the Open University for two months in 2011. Gerard presented his work on Sound Description at a Music Computing Lab Seminar, and also ran a hands-on workshop on SuperCollider.

Mattia Schirosa

mattia.jpgMattia Schirosa is an Interaction Sound Design Researcher working at the Music Technology Group (MTG), Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF). He obtained the Cinema and Multimedia Engineer Master Degree in 2009, in Turin. He worked in several augmented reality productions for theatre, at the Music Technology research Lab, and in various media productions. His research interests focus on Soundscape exploration/composition and Acoustic Ecology research. He has worked on the development of a software application written in SuperCollider.

Dr Erwin Schoonderwalt

erwin.jpgErwin Schoonderwalt is part of the Speech, Music and Hearing (TMH) group at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm. His PhD studies were dedicated to bow-string interaction, the physics of the bow and bow control by the violin player. Furthermore, he is involved in research projects on software development for music education.


External Collaborators and Associate Members

Prof Martin Clayton
Prof. John Cook
Dr Byron Dueck
Dr Patrick Hill
Dr Patricia Howard
Dr Sergi Jordà
Fabien Leon
Prof. Eduardo Miranda
Dr Allan Seago
Dr Fred Seddon
Prof. William Sethares
Dr Mat Smith
Dr Sylvia Truman


Research Groups and Departments Associated with our Research

Music Department
Pervasive Interaction
Acoustics
The Knowledge Media Institute (KMI)
Mathematics and Statistics
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